Powered by Blogger.

Friday, April 26, 2013

     Waimea Canyon State Park on Kauai's West Side encompasses 7.5 km² and provides an unprecedented wilderness area with numerous hiking trails. Waimea Canyon, also known as the Grand Canyon of the Pacific, is a 16 km long and up to 900 m deep canyon created by unique geological process of a catastrophic collapse of an enormous volcano that has risen the Island of Kauai from the ocean floor. It was then carved for thousands of years by rivers flowing from Mount Waialeale's summit, one of the wettest places on earth. The lines in the canyon walls depict lava flows that have slowly occurred over the centuries while the river had carved a deep incision reaching the floor of the canyon and eroding the red soil giving the whole plane the name Waimea - "reddish water". The canyon is now protected by the Kokee State Park which encompasses 4,345 acres of land and has 45 miles of trails that run through the canyon and the nearby Alakai Swamp. The deep, red and dry walls of the Waimea canyon are in stark contrast to Kauai’s overall lushness and dark green interior, and are an inevitable part of any Kauai's adventure.


Access

     Take the highway 50 west from Hanapepe toward the town of Waimea. From Waimea, the Waimea Canyon can be accessed on Hawaiʻi state road 550, which is 18 miles long and leads up to Koke'e State ParkWaimea Canyon Drive is on the right just past Mile Marker #23 and leads you to a lower lookout point and the main Waimea Canyon Overlook, offering views of Kauai's dramatic interior. The road continues into the mountains and ends at Pu'u o Kila Lookout in the Kokee State Park. Makaha Ridge Road runs off Waimea Canyon Road just before Mile Market #14 and travels to more scenic lookouts.


Useful Links

http://www.everytrail.com/best/hiking-waimea-canyon-state-park
http://www.everytrail.com/guide/pihea-amp-alaka-i-swamp-trail-koke-e-sp-kauai
http://www.kauaiexplorer.com/


     By combining the following shorter and very popular day hikes with longer, rougher and more challenging all day adventures you can create numerous itineraries that will take you deeper into Kauai's wilderness where you can enjoy the remoteness in all its beauty.

1. Kukui & Waimea Canyon Trail


     The Kukui Trail in Kokee State Park will take you on a journey into Waimea Canyon, known as Grand Canyon of the South Pacific, as it descends 2000 feet to the canyon floor. This 5 miles round trip will offer you incredible views across countless valleys of the canyon covered by all shades of green and red with many cascading waterfalls. The Waimea Canyon Trail (11.5miles) starts at the bottom of the Kukui Trail and follows the bends of the Waimea River to the historic town of Waimea.


2. Pihea & Alakai Swamp Trail



     Beginning at Pu‘u O Kila Lookout over Kalalau Valley in Kokee State Park, Pihea Trail follows the back rim of Kalalau valley 4000ft above the ocean to Pihea Vista lookout that offers amazing panoramic views of the Napali coast below.





     The trail is uneven, a little bit rough and can become slippery and muddy after the rain. Weather generally changes very quickly and the ever-present clouds often obscure the views, however that only adds to magic of the place while hiking through one of the highest swamps in the world sitting on top of the mountain.





     The trail then heads towards the crossing with the Alakai swamp trail and these two can be combined for an all-day hiking adventure. As there is a boardwalk over the swamps, the trail is easy to follow and the views from the cliff edge at the end of the trail are just breathtaking, overlooking the Wainiha Pali and the Hanalaei town in the distance.The inland views stretch all the way to the western face of the Mt Waialeale.









3. Awaawapuhi & Nualolo Cliff Trail



     The Awaawapuhi Trail (6.5 miles circuit track) in Kokee State Park offers some of the best vistas on Kauai’s Na Pali Coast as it takes you on an ultimate journey descending from 4,120 feet elevation in the Kokee State Park to the valley rim of Nualolo and Awa'awapuhi valleys at 2,500 feet. The trail head is about 1.5 miles past the Kokee Museum at Kokee State Park in parking area near the highway 17 mile marker.





     The trail leads you continuously downhill through unique ecosystems of Hawaiian dry forest and high desert like terrain  to grassy clearings overlooking the valleys. At about the three mile mark there is a track junction with the Nualolo Cliff Trail which adds about 5 miles to this hiking adventure although you will have to walk 1.5 miles on the road back to your car.






Thursday, April 25, 2013

      
     Deep inside every hiker's soul is a special place; a place which sometimes doesn't get filled even with the most exciting adventures. Which had been there before he was born and stays within him to enshrine only the most sacred journeys. The Kalalau Trail along the incredible Na Pali coastline on Kauai was one of those journeys that stayed preserved in our hearts as irreplaceable and sacred places which will make us return many times.


The Kalalau Beach

    
     The world-famous Kalalau trail, the challenging 22 miles track (3-4 days) along the Na Pali cliffs and one of the most scenic and remote coastal trails on the planet, provides the only land access to the legendary Kalalau Beach and is an absolute "must-do"  for anyone coming to Hawaii to enjoy its hiking. The Kalalau Trail begins at Ke`e Beach and provides the only land access to the rugged Na Pali coastline up to Kalalau Valley where it is blocked by sheer cliffs rising from the ocean and no further access inland or along the coast path is possible. It is a challenging track situated on the narrow edge of high cliffs and traversing 5 valleys before it descends back to the sea level at Kalalau Beach. The trail is very rough and muddy and exposed to the hot sun and dry weather of the western coast of Kauai. Water is only available from a few streams and has to be filtered. By attempting to hike right into this very heart of the breathtaking beauty of the Na Pali coast, you'll be also following the original route used by the ancient Hawaiians who lived in Kalalau Valley or to transport foods grown in the remote valleys. If you don't have time you can also decide to walk only as fas as Hanakapiai Beach (2 miles), from where you can hike up the valley for additional 2 miles through the bamboo forest to the large pool underneath the Hanakapiai Falls. The second part of the track leading up the river trail for another 2 miles can be rocky and muddy, but definitely worth the effort (Hanakapiai trail).

Access

     The Kalalau trailhead is located at Kee Beach in Haena State Park at the end of Kuhio Highway. A 2-mile hike one-way (4 hours round-trip) takes you to Hanakapiai Beach with an option to hike to Hanakapiai waterfalls 2 miles further up into the valley. The trail beyond Hanakapiai becomes very rough and strenuous as it starts traversing along the coastal valleys, and is recommended for experienced hikers only. Continuing past Hanakapiai originally required a hiking permit, however as of January 2012 day-use permits have been discontinued and day hiking is allowed all the way to Hanakoa Valley (6 miles). To proceed beyond Hanakoa Valley you have to purchase an overnight camping permit even if you intend to return the same day.


Camping

     You have to purchase an overnight hiking permit for any camping, kayak landings (allowed in summer only), and hikes if proceeding beyond Hanakoa Valley. Camping permits can be obtained online at www.hawaiistateparks.org or at any State Parks office. Camping is only allowed in the designated camping areas at Hanakoa Valley (the first or the last night on the trail) and Kalalau Valley. There is a maximum stay of 5 nights within the park. The entrance into the Napali Coast State Wilderness Park is free, however camping permits are $15 per person per night for Hawaii residents and $20 per person per night for non-residents. Camping is very simple with no facilities besides a few composting facilities and a hut in Hanakoa Valley. There is no cell phone reception and you will have to hike all the way out in case of any emergency. Water is available only from streams and waterfalls and has to be treated, filtered or boiled. Contracting leptospirosis by drinking untreated water or swimming in streams with open cuts or wounds is unfortunately a real danger. Sun protection and mosquito repellent are essential. Open fires are not allowed and you have to carry the fuel stove for cooking. Lightweight sleeping bag should be sufficient. You have to carry all the rubbish out with you.

Weather

     Summer months (May to September) are generally hot and humid with occasional rain. During winter months frequent showers or even storms with flash floods are possible. The sea conditions at both Hanakapiai and Kalalau Beach are generally not suitable for swimming or bodysurfing. The rip currents and high surfs during the winter has led to numerous drownings.


Track Notes

Kee Beach to Hanakapiai Beach (2 miles, 1-2 hours)


     The first section of the Kalalu trail is an easy 2 hour hike climbing steadily up from the Kee Beach and descending gradually to the Hanakapiai stream crossing. It is a popular day trip and the trail can get busy with day hikers. We set off quite late, a little after 2pm, so most of the people were already returning back to the car park and we were left with uninterrupted views of the spectacular Napali coastline disappearing in the distance.




     After an easy hour and a half hike we descended back to the seas level at the stream crossing at Hanakapiai beach which we waded easily. An unmaintained 3km track leads up the stream towards the base of the Hanakapiai falls  deep in the valley. We started to walk up, but soon realized we probably won't have enough time to reach the falls as it was already 4pm and we had to get into the Hanakoa valley during daylight. The track is quite steep, muddy and rocky, but definitely worth it if you have time.



Hanakapiai Beach to Hanakoa Valley (4 miles, 3-4 hours)


     The next section of the track started as a strenuous climb out of Hanakapi'ai valley. We had about 3 hours of light left and still about 4 challenging miles to conquer that day. We still had to traverse a few high cliffs and descend back to hanging valleys before reaching Hanakoa Valley for the first night. It was just after 4pm, but the sun was still incredibly strong and made our ascents quite exhausting. The views of the Napali coast that were opening in front of us however made our effort absolutely worth it. The sun was approaching the horizon very quickly and we started to worry that we wouldn't make it to the Hanakoa campsite in time. The last few miles the path was positioned high on the cliffs and too narrow for trying to traverse it in the dark. We made it to the Hanakoa Stream crossing just in time when a huge wild pig crossed our path. It didn't notice us, but we had to wait until it's gone and crossed the stream in complete darkness. There is no shoreline access at Hanakoa campsite and only limited facilities consisting of a shelter and a composting toilet. For those who manage to arrive early, there is a poorly marked and very eroded 700m trail up the east fork of the stream to spectacular Hanakoa falls.


Hanakoa Valley to Kalalau Beach (5 miles, 5 hours)


     Next morning we left the Hanakoa valley quite early since we knew that the last section separating us from the Kalalau beach is the most challenging one being positioned on a narrow footpath high on the cliffs and very exposed to the excruciating midday sun. Suddenly the miles of dramatic drop-offs to the ocean opened in front of us and we soon realized that it will be one of the most memorable tracks we've ever experienced. 












     The section between 7th and 9th mile are especially hard and require being in a presence with every step. Realizing the scenery surrounding us, that wasn't a particularly difficult challenge. 



     Finaly the trail opened up into the Kalalau valley, spectacular play of red and green rising up the fluted cliffs, and we started our descent to the Kalalau beach.









     The trail crosses Kalalau Stream near the valley mouth before reaching the Kalalau Beach and a small waterfall. We picked a shaded campsite beneath the trees at the back of the beach just underneath the cliffs. There is a magnificent sea cave at the end of the beach where the high cliff blocks the path and the rest of the coastline beyond it becomes inaccessible. We spent the rest of the afternoon exploring this amazing place at the every end of the world.




Sunday, April 21, 2013

   
  There are only a few days in the whole year when the Mt Waialeale, the "Mountain of Rippling Waters" feels in a generous mood to let you up her river track to the very base of the legendary "Wall of the Tears". If you're lucky enough she'll reveal you what has to be one of the most scenic sights on the planet: where the green mountain fuses with white clouds into one as countless silk threads of waterfalls are cascading down the sheer 4000 ft mossy cliffs. On the day we decided to go up the Blue Hole track we were not that lucky as the river dangerously flooded after the ever-present rain, but we still got close enough to taste this incredible world of the very heart of Kauai Island.























     Kawaikini (1593m) is the highest point of the extinct shield volcano (Mt Waialeale) in the centre of Hawaiian Island of Kauai, which has been known as one of the rainiest and most scenic spots on the planet, and (officially) inaccessible by foot. The name Waialeale ("rippling waters") was originally given to the small lake at the northern end of the summit rim, but it's been known as a common name for the mountain as a whole. Besides the heavy rains, which make it almost impossible to summit 345 days out of 365, from the north, east and south, Kawaikini is guarded by sheer mossy cliffs covered by cascading waterfalls feeding the Wailua River beneath, and from the west by miles of dense jungle of the unwelcoming Alakai Wilderness Preserve. The main access route is via forbidding Alakai Swamp, whereas the other documented route via the ridge from the northeast was allegedly used by ancient Hawaiians to climb the summit. The remains of their sacred alter are still there.

Wailua River
     The dramatic base of Mt Waialeale, known as the Blue Hole, can also be approached from the east via the Blue Hole trail. For some time, the Blue Hole has been mistaken for the cauldera of an ancient volcano filled with a lake, which only shows how inaccessible this central part of Kauai used to be. A hike into the Blue Hole can be very adventurous involving numerous stream crossings and hiking up the Wailua River feeded by waterfalls falling down the Mt Waialeale which can therefore easily get flooded within a few minutes. The track itself is unmaintained, rough and muddy and although only about 3 miles long from the gates, it can take up to 9 hours in a bad weather, or even be potentially hazardous. This track is excellently described in the Ultimate Kauai  Guidebook, the best book ever written on Kauai. 




     To access the trailhead we took Kaumoo road west from Wailua. We drove through the jungle to the Keahau Aboretum where we decided to leave out 2WD car. The road from here is very rugged and muddy and only suitable for 4WD vehicles. We needed to cross a few streams and walk another few miles to the gate, and then pass the gate where the road ends and the Mt Waialeale base track starts. We didn't mind hiking this extra distance as the weather was gorgeous and we were walking through one of the most unique tropical rainforests in the world.
     
     We knew however that the closer we get to the mountain, the progressively worse the weather gets. Most of the year the Mt Waialeale is swallowed by thick cloud and persistent rain guarding the eastern wall of the Mt Waialeale by swelling the Wailua River beneath and preventing walking up the stream. The only other way to spot this legendary Wall of Tears is to go by one of the helicopter tours, however they don't fly in a bad weather or later in a day, so we enjoyed walking in a complete solitude for the rest of the afternoon.



     As we proceeded beyond the gate, the weather did get worse and soon we were walking in a heavy rain turning the road into muddy pools.










     When we got to the river where the track continues up the stream, the river was still crossable and we disappeared in the forest on the other bank looking for the path that would lead us along the stream. We knew that walking within the stream itself during heavy rain in one of the wettest places on Earth wouldn't be very life-friendly.



     When we got back to the stream 10 minutes later (founding out there's no other way up the stream), the river swole up by incredible half a meter and it was still rising in front of our eyes. We crossed the dangerously fast-flowing river more than knee deep and turned back. There was no way we could continue up this "river trail". We still got close enough to glimpse the white threads of waterfalls falling down the sheer walls of the Mt Waialeale in the distance. Nothing we've ever seen so far. It was one of those days out there when you simply have to bow before forces of nature and be thankful you've got that far.



Saturday, April 20, 2013

    Kauai or "Garden Island" as it's sometimes called, has captured us the most with its pristine tropical rainforests and breathtaking coastal scenery shaped by time and the elements into incredible series of sharp mountain spires, most of which are still an inaccessible wilderness. Kauai is the oldest and northernmost island in the Hawaiian chain and offers endless hiking possibilities in very remote areas which may have never been visited by a human footstep. Whether you want to experience incredible scenery of the steep cathedral cliffs of the Na Pali Coast, vast chasms of Waimea Canyon or some of the best rainforest hiking in one of the wettest regions on Earth, Kauai will resonate will you no matter what type of wilderness you're looking for. Kauai’s remoteness naturally attracts rain clouds and moisture from the surrounding ocean. With its highest peaks of Kawaikini (1598 m) and Waialeale (1569 m), the east side of Kauai Island well may be one of the most waterfall-rich places you’ll ever experience. The west side, on the contrary, will offer you a unique world of Hawaiian tropical dry forests. Hiking on Kauai is one of those experiences that will feed your adventurous soul for the rest of your life. And while the rest of Hawaii is struggling to redefine its lost identity, Kauai's nature has always been there: untouched, unconquered, sacred.
 From all the islands, the island of

Wall Of Tears on Mt Waialeale


  • KAWAIKINI (MT WAIALEALE): Kawaikini (1593m) is the highest summit of the extinct shield volcano (Mt Waialeale) in the centre of Hawaiian Island of Kauai, which has been known as one of the rainiest and most scenic spots on the planet, and (officially) inaccessible by foot. The name Waialeale ("rippling waters") was originally given to the small lake at the northern end of the summit rim, but it's been known as a common name for the mountain as a whole. Besides the heavy rains, which make it almost impossible to summit 345 days out of 365, from the north, east and south, Kawaikini is guarded by sheer mossy cliffs covered by cascading waterfalls feeding the Wailua River beneath, and from the west by miles of dense, swampy jungle of the unwelcoming Alakai Wilderness Preserve. The main access route is via forbidding Alakai Swamp, whereas the other documented route via the ridge from the northeast was allegedly used by ancient Hawaiians to climb the summit. The remains of their sacred alter are still there. 
  • THE BLUE HOLE TRACK: The Blue Hole trail leads to the dramatic base of the vertical east side of Mount Waialeale, known as the Blue Hole because of the countless waterfalls cascading down its sheer cliffs. For some time, the Blue Hole has been mistaken for the cauldera of an ancient volcano filled with a lake, which only shows how inaccessible this central part of Kauai used to be. A hike into the Blue Hole can be very adventurous involving numerous stream crossings and hiking up the Wailua River feeded by waterfalls falling down the Mt Waialeale which can therefore easily get flooded within a few minutes. The track itself is unmaintained, rough and muddy and although only about 3 miles long, it can take up to 9 hours in a bad weather, or even be potentially hazardous.
  • KALALAU TRAIL: The world-famous Kalalau trail, the challenging 22 miles track (3-4 days) along the Na Pali cliffs and one of the most scenic and remote coastal trails on the planet, provides the only land access to the legendary Kalalau Beach and is an absolute "must-do"  for anyone coming to Hawaii to enjoy its hiking. For most of its length this track is very rough being situated on the narrow edge on high cliffs and consisting of series of steep ascents and descents. The trail begins at Ke`e Beach and traverses along a few coastal valleys high above ocean until it opens up into Kalalau Valley at the end of the accessible coastline. The trail can be very muddy and exposed to the hot sun and dry weather of the western coast of Kauai. Water is only available from a few streams and has to be filtered. By attempting to hike right into this very heart of the breathtaking beauty of the Na Pali coast, you'll be also following the original route used by the ancient Hawaiians who lived in Kalalau Valley.
  • HANAKAPIAI TRAIL: The first section of the Kalalau trail (2 miles) starting at Ke'e beach and leading to Hanakapiai Beach from where you can decide to hike up the valley through the bamboo forest to the large pool underneath the Hanakapiai Falls. The second part of the track leading up the river trail for another 2 miles can be rocky and muddy, but definitely worth the effort.
  • PIHEA TRAIL: much easier but no less spectacular 8 miles round-trip via the Alakai Swamp, the highest swamp in the world situated 4,000 feet above the Kalalau Valley floor. The trailhead is located in Kokee State Park at the end of Hwy. 550 at the Puu o Kila scenic lookout. It is a moderate and very popular track followed by boardwalk over the swamps with spectacular views of the Kalalau Valley in a good weather. The inland views stretch all the way to the western face of the Mt Waialeale.
  • KUKUI TRAIL: The Kukui Trail in Kokee State Park will take you on a journey into Waimea Canyon, known as Grand Canyon of the South Pacific, as it descends 2000 feet to the canyon floor. This 5 miles round trip will offer you incredible views across countless valleys of the canyon covered by all shades of green and red with many cascading waterfalls. The Waimea Canyon Trail (11.5miles) starts at the bottom of the Kukui Trail and follows the bends of the Waimea River to the historic town of Waimea.
  • AWAAWAPUHI TRAIL: The Awaawapuhi Trail (3.2 miles one way) in Kokee State Park offers some of the best vistas on Kauai’s Na Pali Coast as it descends from 4,120 feet elevation in the Kokee State Park to the valley rim of Nualolo and Awa'awapuhi valleys at 2,500 feet. At about the three mile mark is the junction of the Nualolo Cliff Trail.
  • THE POWERLINE TRAIL: The Powerline trail leads you from the North Shore along the eastern boundaries of Halelea Forest Reserve to Keahua Forestry Arboretum in Wailua. It is a difficult all-day 11.2 miles hike which gives you spectacular panoramatic views across the whole island up to the ocean in the distance.
  • SLEEPING GIANT: Sleeping Giant or Nonou Mountain is a small peak just outside the town of Wailua. As one of a very few  Kauai's peaks is easily accessible via marked trail  reaching its summit. For an easy access take the main highway to Wailua, then turn west on Haleilio Road and follow that road for approximately 1.25 miles to the Nonou Mountain Trailhead on the right side of the road. Sleeping Giant offers excellent summit views in all directions: coastal towns of Wailua and Kapa'a to the east, the Ha'upu Mountain to the south and King Kong Mountain to the north.
  • HAUPU MOUNTAIN: Haupu is the summit on the east-west ridge separating the towns Poipu on the south and Lihue on the southeast of Kauai. There are no marked routes and most of the area is on private land. As most of the peaks on Kauai the route to its summit is very rugged along steep cliffs  and through dense vegetation. However you can drive as close as a few miles of the summit and with the permission from the land owners as well as a good amount of "off-track" hiking experience reaching the top should be possible.
  • LAAUHIHAIHAI & KAHILI: Laauhihaihai and Kahili are two lower peaks along the ridge south of Kapalaoa also lie on private land and can be accessed via a trail starting from Kahili Mountain Park. The track gets very rough and narrow towards the end.
Kalalau Valley from Pihea Trail 


How to get there and around

   
 Most of the visitors arrive in Kauai through the Lihue airport on the east side of the island. The main airlines Hawaiian, and American Airlines provide international connections via stopover in Honolulu (Oahu), although there are a few direct flights from San Francisco and Los Angeles.    
     To get around the island and access some of the most remote areas you will need to hire a 4WD vehicle in Lihue which serves all of the major rental companies. To get around the island is pretty straightforward as the main highway encircles 3/4 of the Kauai's coast and there's no road via Na Pali coast on the northwest side. Highway 56 runs north out of Lihue all the way to Kee Beach and the start of the Napali Coast. Highway 50 runs south from Lihue towards Poipu. Waimea Canyon and Kokee State Park are reached via route 550 out of Waimea or route 55 in Kekaha.

Camping and accommodation

     Camping on Kauai is divided into Beach Park campsites and State Park campsites.
     Camping is allowed in the following beach parks: Haena Park, Hanalei Blackpot Park (open Friday & Saturday only), Anini Beach Park, Anahola Beach Park, Hanamaulu Beach Park (open Thursday, Friday & Saturdays only), Salt Pond Park, Lucy Wright Park and Lydgate Park Camp Ground. Camping permit fees are $3.00 per adult per night for non-residents.
     Camping is allowed at three Kaua’i parks: Koke’e State Park above Waimea Canyon, and Polihale State Park on the island’s west side, each offer tent camping opportunities with minimally developed campsites. The rates are $18 per campsite per night for up to 6 persons. Camping in Napali Coast State Wilderness Park offers unique camping experience along a stunning rugged coastline. Due to the high demand for Napali Coast camping permits, special rules and fees apply.

Contacts:

The County of Kauai, Department of Parks & Recreation, Park Permits Section
Phone: 808-241-4463
Office Hours 8:15 am to 4:00 pm Monday thru Friday
Address: 4444 Rice Street, Suite 105, Lihuʻe, HI 96766
email: recpermits@kauai.gov

Division of State Parks
3060 Eiwa Street, Suite 306
Lihue, Hawai‘i  96766
Phone: (808) 274-3444
http://www.hawaiistateparks.org/

Weather

     The main weather factor which effects planning of any hiking holiday on Kauai is the rain. The rainiest spot is at the summit of Mt. Waialeale, averaging almost 300 inches per year, while the driest area on the southwest coast averages barely 25 inches per year. And although the weather conditions especially in the interior area of the island can change unexpectedly, temperatures rarely drop below 60F and most of the trails are accessible any time of the year. Always check the latest weather forecast, especially if hiking in the area around Alakai Swamp, the base of the Mt Waialeale or Waimea Canyon.

Useful Links

http://www.kauai.com/hikes
http://www.gohawaii.com/kauai/guidebook/topics/hiking-on-kauai
http://www.everytrail.com/best/hiking-kauai-hawaii
http://www.kauaiexplorer.com/
http://www.hawaiistateparks.org/
http://www.summitpost.org/
http://www.snwburd.com/bob/
http://www.veltra.com/en/hawaii/kauai/
http://www.waialeale.org/

Na Pali Coast from Kalalau Beach (Kalalau Trail)


Friday, April 19, 2013

     Freycinet Peninsula on Tasmania's famous east coast belongs to one of the most beautiful coastal areas in the world. The white beach and turquoise waters of Wineglass Bay surrounded by granite peaks of the Hazards, Mt Freycinet and Mt Graham have been attracting day visitors from all over the world. However if you decide to spend a few nights and explore the more remote parts of the Peninsula, the rewards will be very hard to surpass.



     The 30 kilometre (2-3 days) Freycinet Peninsula Circuit leads you around the Hazard Mountains to Hazards Beach. The track continues south to the more remote Cooks and Bryans Beaches. You then have to cross the Peninsula over a plateau via Mt Graham with spectacular views before descending to the Wineglass Bay. You can also decide to  spend a few days at the Wineglass Bay campsite. As there is no water, most hikers continue to other beaches early in the morning and you can have the beach during the day almost completely to yourself. You would need to carry the water in or make a trip to one of the little streams on Mt Graham which is about 400m climb.



     Freycinet Peninsula Circuit track starts at the car park about 4 km further into the park from the Visitor Information Centre. The walking times are as follows: Wineglass Bay car park to Wineglass Bay 1.5 hours and to Hazard Beach 3 hours, Hazard's Beach to Cook's Beach 2 hours, Cook's Beach to Bryan's Beach - 1 hour and Cook's Beach to Wineglass Bay via Mt Graham 6 hours.


Camping

     
     Camping sites for F
reycinet Peninsula Circuit track exist at the following locations: southern end of Hazard's Beach
Cook's Beach and the southern end of Wineglass BayCamping is free and the more remote sites at Hazard's Beach and Cook's Beach get less busy during the summer. Freycinet National Park is within a fuel stove only area and campfires are not permitted. There's no water available at Wineglass Bay.

 

Weather  

 
      Freycinet Peninsula has been known for its mild maritime climate which makes it suitable for a visit any time of the year. Although weather conditions can change rapidly, mild climate enables pleasant winter walking and is certainly less busy. Summer months provide longer day light hours and higher temperatures and therefore activities like swimming are also possible.

Access


     The Freycinet National Park is about 3 hours from either Hobart or Launceston. Turn off the Tasman Highway (A3) onto the Coles Bay Road (C302) 12 km south of Bicheno. The main park entrance and visitor centre are just after Coles Bay town about 30km from the highway. Freycinet Peninsula Circuit track starts at the car park about 4 km further into the park from the Visitor Information Centre.

Useful links

About us



There are so many reasons not to start a travel blog.
And just go. And let it go.
Let the memories sink into the setting sun.

But I've promised myself, way back when the life didn't belong to me yet, that I would never say no to life in any of its spontaneous insanities, to any of its fears,to any of its challenges. That when I feel that it is the time to subtract rather than add anything else to my life, to run towards something rather than escape from, to share rather than receive, I will do so. I will subtract, I will run and I will share... read more...